Adjunct Pay and Benefits at the
University of Hartford

and Surrounding Schools
(revised 10/25/2007)

 

Background:

  • Nationally, the use of part-time faculty has been growing steadily and is about 46%. Many details about this growth and some of the causes and consequences can be found at the following AAUP site: http://www.aaup.org/AAUP/issues/contingent/
  • The University of Hartford has a similar pattern. A recent tally of adjunct teaching in the College of Arts and Sciences indicated about 47% of the courses were taught by adjuncts—with nearly 90% in RLC. Hillyer College is reported to have similar rates. The preliminary accreditation report gave an overall rate of about 48%. If you know the rates for your department or school, please contact Jay Stewart (x4331).
  • Thanks to pressure from the Faculty Senate’s Adjunct pay committee (Chair: Don Jones and, previously, Cynthia Ritvo) the University formed a committee back in 2005 to study the topic of adjunct pay at our school and in the surrounding schools that compete with us for adjuncts. Their report could not be released to the public because some of the schools released the pay rates under “confidentiality”. The executive summary of this report is located: http://uhaweb.hartford.edu/facsenate/ADJ_COMP_PLAN_JAN_06.HTM Subsequently, President Harrison supported the recommendations.

Actions & Results:

  • The pay rates seemed minimal compared to what we heard adjuncts saying they could earn at these other schools, so we decided to collect our own data. The executive report had noted that we compete with five schools: UCONN, CCSU, Quinnipiac University (QU), and Manchester and Capital Communicty Colleges (CCC). Most of these schools have union-negotiated pay rates. The pay data are easily obtained on the web or by a phone call, as documented later. The only school unwilling to disclose adjunct pay data--beyond a starting base--is the University of Hartford. The UHA rates shown below are those given in a few College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) departments until the 2005-6 year, which used an average of the CAS value and the new floor of $2600 for spring 2006. After that the UHA values are the new base pay rates and represent median pay rates (½ of adjuncts have less and ½ have more). We are quite certain that the UHA pay rates shown below are close approximations to the median adjunct pay for 3 credit courses over this time period AND must be correct for the 2006-2007 period, given the reported percents of adjuncts whose pay is improved in this period. Figure 1 provides a quick overview of our results, where the "_L" and "_H" after a school name indicate its lowest and highest rates respectively. More details about each school are given below the chart.
  • A MS-Word version of the charts and data on this webpage is available here.

 

Figure 1. Nominal Pay for 3-Credit Course over Time for Selected Schools*

 

The Pay Rates: Every school, except UHA, has a formal system of pay ranks based upon experience and/or degree. The lowest and highest within each system are marked with “_L” and “_H” on each school name. Except for UCONN and UHA, adjunct pay is largely determined by the formal ranks based on experience and/or degree, i.e., adjunct professors in most disciplines receive the same pay.
All of the original comparison schools had union-negotiated pay rates, even QU until the 2006-7 year. The pay data are easily obtained on the web or by a phone call, as documented below. The only school unwilling to disclose adjunct pay data is the University of Hartford, except for the official base pay. The UHA rates shown here are those given in a few CAS departments until the 2005-6 year, which used an average of the CAS value and the new base of $2600 for spring 2006. After that the UHA values are the new “base” pay rates, which probably represent median pay rates (½ of adjuncts have less than or equal and ½ have more) because the new base rate in Fall 2007 was predicted to raise the pay for 77% of our adjuncts.

 

More Details about the Displayed Pay Levels at the Competing Schools: Here are the raw data:

Acad.Year (fall)

UCONN Low2

UCONN High2

CCSU Low3

CCSU High3

CCC Low4

CCC High4

QU Non-Term. Deg.5

QU Term. Deg. 5

QU Grad Course5

UHA6

SJC7
Low

SJC7
High

2001

.

.

.

.

2847

3066

2298

2700

3294

2600

 

 

2002

3630

3666

2994

3510

2988

3219

2298

2700

3294

2600

 

 

2003

3738

3775

3144

3684

2988

3219

2463

3012

3528

2600

 

 

2004

3837

3883

3144

3684

3138

3381

2700

3210

3750

2600

 

 

2005

3939

3984

3301

3868

3294

3549

2835

3375

3900

2650

 

 

2006

4052

4098

3465

4059

3459

3726

3000

3600

4101

2850

2000

3200

2007

4047

4087

3621

4242

3633

3912

3744

4230

----

3000

2600

3300

2008

4155

4197

3783

4434

3816

4107

 

 

 

 

 

 

2009

4269

4312

3954

4635

4008

4311

 

 

 

 

 

 

2010

4383

4427

4011

4845

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UCONN: There are two levels. The upper level is at least 1% more than the lower level and used when a teacher has two, continuous years of teaching. These provide minimums from which the adjunct professor and the hiring chair negotiate. According to the UCONN AAUP representative I talked to, the negotiated pay is based upon degree, length of experience, discipline, etc. without any apparent formal system.

CCSU: There are six levels of pay based only on type of degree and teaching experience. These are (almost) fixed pay rates that do not vary by discipline. The lowest is for non-terminal degrees and less than 30 load credit hours of experience, i.e., less than 10 3-credit courses. This is the “CCSU_L” value in the above chart. Levels 2-3 are for increasing experience, but still non-terminal degrees. The 4-6th levels are for teachers with terminal degrees. The “CCSU_H” value in the above chart is for the 6th level, which is for a person with a terminal degree and having taught more than 20 3-credit courses. Emeritus professors teaching part-time and other “celebrity” scholars can be paid even more: up to $500-700 above the CCSU_H rate.

CCC: The Manchester and Capital Community Colleges have only two rates, which are based upon teaching experience. The CC_L rate is for those with less than 18 credit hours (or 6 3-credit courses). The CC_H is for those with 18 or more credit hours of experience. These are fixed rates that do not vary at all based upon other factors.

QU: Before 2007 QU had three levels based upon degree and type of course (undergrad or graduate) taught. These are fixed rates that do not depend upon discipline. (QU law faculty are paid a little more now, but less in 2006.)  QU_L is for undergraduate instructors with non-terminal degrees. QU_T is for undergraduate professors with terminal degrees, which is what the majority of adjuncts were paid in 2006. QU_G is for adjuncts teaching graduate level courses. In 2007 QU changed to 3 levels based upon teaching experience at QU and an additional $300 for a terminal degree (if teaching a 3 credit course). There is no separate rate for teaching graduate level courses now, so that line on the graph stopped in 2006. The QU_H line is for an adjunct professor with a terminal degree and 10+ years of teaching at QU.

 

Terminal Degree?

Years Experience at QU

No

Yes

  Less than 5

$3744

$4044

  5-9 years

$3837

$4137

  10 years or more

$3930

$4230

SJC: In 2006 there were six pay rates that did not vary by discipline, except nursing faculty had different rates. Experience categories of <9, 9-17, 18+ credit hours of college teaching experience were combined with a $200 or $300 increment for terminal degree. In 2007 the experience categories were reduced to two (<7 and 7+) with a $200 or $300 increase for terminal degree.

 

NOTE: I recently got an email from a lab instructor with adjunct positions at CCC, CCSU, and UHA. It was noted that pay was calculated quite differently at the different schools. We pay on basis of credits earned in the lab, regardless of how long the lab lasts. At CCC the pay is based upon the actual hours of lab. I also recall that pay at some schools is increased for classes above specific sizes. I hope to investigate these issues soon.

Benefits and Qualifications for Benefits:

UHA:

=> Allowed to participate in health insurance at group rate, but must pay full cost.
=> Sports Center membership (?)
=> Part-time faculty can take one course, tuition free—space permitting—during the semester they are teaching here or the following semester.
=>
Although part-timers with G3 contracts are given some benefits after one year, the benefits listed here for the other schools do not require additional contracts—only extended periods of employment.

UCONN: (http://www.uconnaaup.org/documents/AAUPContract.pdf ) UCONN AAUP office: 860-487-0450.

=> Those teaching 8 credits or less:
> Retirement plan participation with 5% of salary from the faculty and 8% from the university.
> Allowed to participate in health insurance at group rate, but must pay full cost.

=> IF teaching 2 courses now and for last four semesters, $~900 in professional development funds.

=>  Those teaching 9 credits or more get full benefits.

=> Those teaching 9 credits in combination at state colleges or universities will be reimbursed the state’s share of health insurance premium costs: see
http://www.uconnaaup.org/documents/ADJUNCT8-10-2007-INTERDEPARTMENTALMEMORANDUM_000.doc

 

CCSU:  ( http://www.ccsu.edu/aaup/csu/AAUP2007-2011FINALContact2007[1].pdf  ) 
CSU AAUP office: 860-832-3790

  • No more than 20% of the course load taught at CCSU will be taught by part-time faculty.
  • Retirement plan participation with 5% of salary from the faculty and 8% from the university.
  • 10% of all faculty travel and development funds for attending conferences or professional workshops will be given to part-time faculty for these purposes.
  • If a course is cancelled within 7 days of its starting date, the part-time teacher will receive $330.
  • Free access to all recreational facilities on campus.
  • Waived tuition fees for the part-time faculty members, spouse, or child, if the part-time faculty member has taught 18 or more credits at CCSU. Only during the semester of current appointment or the following semester and on a space available basis, but the course instructor can override this restriction.
  • Allowed to participate in health insurance at group rate, but must pay full cost. (See UCONN note for those teaching 9 or more credits in combination across state schools.)

Community Colleges (MCC & CCC): (http://www.the4cs.org/docUploads/PTGuide%206.2005.pdf ) The 4C’s union office is at 296-5172.

=> Those teaching half-time or less (below 17.5 hours/week):

> Retirement plan participation with 5% of salary from the faculty and 8% from the university.

> Allowed to participate in health insurance at group rate, but must pay full cost. (See UCONN note for those teaching 9 or more credits in combination across state schools.)

> Travel and development funds for attending conferences or professional workshops.

> Some sick leave days after their third semester.

> Job security after 24 credits: guaranteed offer of a course in their discipline, if one is available.

=> Those teaching half-time (17.5 hours/week) or more get full benefits.

Quinnipiac: (Quinnipiac University Part-Time Faculty Handbook 2005-2006 (pages 25-26) and Oct. 21, 2005 letter and conversations Sept. 2007 from Sarah Steele, Associate Vice President for Faculty Relations.

  • Free participation in the Fitness and Recreational facilities.
  • IF teaching 6 or more credits now and over each of the last four semesters:
    => the university will pay 40% of the amount given full-time faculty for health insurance..
    => retirement plan participation with 5% of salary from the faculty and 5% from the university.
    => after 5 years of continuous service, the university will contribute 10% of salary to retirement with no required contributions from the part-time faculty member.
  • Laptop computer loans for part-time faculty who need them for more effective teaching.
  • Reduced tuition fees for the part-time faculty or family members on a pro-rata basis for part-time faculty members teaching 3 or more credits now and over each of the last four semesters. Only on a space available basis.

SJC: Membership in the sports center (?).


Sources and notes:

2. The UCONN rates are available at: http://www.uconnaaup.org/resources/contract.html in Article 19- Section IV and for 2007-2011 at: http://www.uconnaaup.org/documents/AAUPContract.pdf on page 28. There are two levels. The upper level is at least 1% more than the lower level and used when a teacher has two, continuous years of teaching. These two rates provide the floor on salary negotiations, that is, they are the minimum rates.

3. The CCSU rates are available at pages 81-82 in the text of :
http://w3.sysoff.ctstateu.edu/web/CSUweb_Administration.nsf/b7989b92524436ce852569d8004a4615/32585fffa21adc4c852569ee001ebb49/$FILE/2002-2006%20CSU-AAUP%20Contract%20(a).pdf
with 2006-2007 rates given at: http://www.ccsu.edu/aaup/csu/Contract%20Agreement.pdf  
with 2007-2011 rates at: http://www.ccsu.edu/aaup/csu/AAUP2007-2011FINALContact2007[1].pdf  on page 86.
There are 6 levels. The lowest is for non-terminal degrees and less than 30 load credit hours of experience, i.e., 10 3 credit courses. This is the “Low” value in the above table. The 4-6th levels are for teachers with terminal degrees. The “High” values in the above table are for the 5th level, which is for a person with a terminal degree and having taught 10-20 3-credit courses. The 6th level is almost $150 more than shown above, but seemed like an unreasonable comparison group, so was not presented in the charts or this table. There is a “maximum” for unusual cases, such as emeritus professors, which is $700 or more above the “high” shown above.

4. Both MCC and CCC have a union contract with salaries given at: http://www.the4cs.org/contracts/Default.aspx .The two pay levels are fixed and based upon experience only. The “Low” pay is for “less than 18 credit hours” and the “High” pay is for “18 or more credit hours.”

5. The Quinnipiac University rates for 2004-2005 are located on printed page 37 of:
http://www.quinnipiac.edu/PreBuilt/pdf/Manuals/manual_policies_june2005.pdf
The other rates are from QU’s Vice President for Faculty Relations. There are three fixed pay rates at QU and are only based upon degree and course level. The QU “non-terminal degree” rates are for undergraduate courses taught by instructors without a terminal degree. The majority of adjuncts are paid at the terminal degree rate (including many that do not have the terminal degree, as that rate was rarely used in the past). The highest rate is for graduate level courses.

6. The older UHA rates are based upon a couple of “typical” CAS departments before this year, but I know some that were even lower. The rate for year “2005” is the average of the departments’ rates for last fall and the new base rate for spring 2006. These are base rates, but they are also very close to the average pay as measured by the median (½ below and ½ above) because the committee report noted that 50% to 75% of the adjuncts would have their pay improved at these new base rates, so at least 50% were at or below these new rates to begin with). Do not be misled by reports of higher “average” pay (using the “mean” pay) because the mean is strongly influenced by the highest values, which are given for 4-credit courses, courses in selected colleges, or graduate level courses.

7. The St. Joseph College rates were obtained from their Human Resources Director, Deborah Bradley.

  

A MS-Word version of the charts and data on this webpage is available here.

 

Any questions about the data can be answered by John Stewart, x4331, or jstewart@hartford.edu .