Articles and Presentations

Most of my work has centered on the development and use of DOPSS. There are many pieces to a Dynamic Online Performance Support System. Each DOPSS must be custom designed with a user-centric approach. It is only by studying the users - their needs, the problems they wish to solve, the way they use information, the "sense" they wish to make of what they find - that we may design a system that is useful and used. A wonderful system that is not used is a waste of time and money. A system without flash that answers needs and is used can always improve if we continue to listen to the users.

Below are several articles and presentations that guide or report on our work as well as other articles of interest.

Articles

Implementing InnovationThe challenge of implementing a complex socio-technical software system in a homogenous group. Exploration of using Roger's methods as a prescriptive tool.
Improving Performance Support Systems through Information Retrieval Evaluation, 2006 (JILR 17:4) 1 of the DOPSS trilogy. How do we evaluate the search/retrieval functions? Why is search so bad.. or good (too many hits)? It's based on evaluation.
Designing DOPSS functions: The USE model, 2006 (PIQ 19:2) 1 of the DOPSS trilogy. How to come up with the function set for a DOPSS - each one is unique. User-centric + Sensemaking + Evolutionary.
Desiging Unique Meta Tags for DOPSS, 2005 (ETR&D 53:4) 1 of the DOPSS trilogy. An essential part of DOPSS is unique tags that enable fast adding and retrieving of objects. That allows it to be "filled" by users.
Instructional Design as a Design Science, 2004( PIQ 16:4) Opening the "black box" of design decisions. Alexander and Petroski and Weick and Gabriel. How we can learn from and discuss our practice.
A Little DOPSS will Do You (From PI) Quick and easy overview of DOPSS.
Out of learning - Into Performance An old piece that provides an view of the evolution of the DOPSS ideas.
First article on Learning Objects I first heard about learning objects from Harvi Singh at the Training 99 conference. I was entranced and felt this was an important step. However, no one seemed to understand or think about how instructional designers would use these things. This is often a problem in our field, where we first think "How can it be done?" long before we ask, "How can we use this?" or "Do we need to use this?" I spent the next two years trying to make sense of learning objects. I believe this is the first paper that attempts to look at them from an instructional designer's view.
Paradigm Shifts and Challenges for Instructional Designers: An Introduction to Meta Tags and Knowledge Bits SAn early paper that explains how to use meta tags to support instructional designers. This paper was featured on the IMS project web site.
Dissertation - Evaluation of Information Retrieval (2.8 MgB) Short for a diss, long for anything else. Good description of how it all fits together. Excellent cure for insomnia.

Some Presentations - For older presentations, please contact me.

CT ASTD On the Job Training Conference - Plenary Session - Technological Tools for Training and Performance Support orGardening in the Information Thicket PP Slideshow
Mass CUE 2005- Teachers Help Desk: A Model for online professional development Article discussing the presentation
AERA 2005 - Search Evaluation Became the JILR paper
Paper
AERA 2005 Developing Unique Tagging Schemas
Became the ETR&D Paper

PP Slideshow

TechLearn 2004 - The Trouble with Training is Training PP Slideshow
AERA 2002 - DOPSS functions design PP Slideshow
ELearn Presentation on DOPSS - an early version PP Slideshow
Building Effective Presentations - a summary of the lectures I made at industry conferences during the late 90's. PP Slideshow

Research, Development, Design and Implementation of DOPSS using the latest application of meta tagged objects in the service of learning, knowledge and performance. Supporting a new way of providing support, growing in house expertise.

Contact us for more information:

Steve Schatz
University of Hartford, Hilyer Hall, 200 Bloomfield Avenue, West Hartford, CT 06117
860-768-4277
Email schatz@hartford.edu