Mark Blackwell

Mark R. Blackwell received his BA in English from Princeton University, graduating summa cum laude. He taught high school for two years before beginning graduate studies at Cornell University, where he received his PhD in 1996 and won the Guilford Essay Prize for the dissertation exhibiting the highest standard of excellence in English prose.After four years at California State University, Chico, Blackwell joined the English Department at the University of Hartford in 2001, and now serves as chair of both the English Department and the Department of Rhetoric, Language, and Culture.He teaches upper-level courses on Milton, on seventeenth-century and eighteenth-century British literature, on Romanticism, on Gothic fiction, and on Jane Austen, and he has offered honors seminars entitled Humans & Animals and Representing Death.He has also conducted independent studies on contemporary fiction and on the graphic novel.Dr. Blackwell has published articles on such subjects as Royalist satire in the 1640s and 50s, Miltonic allusions in John Drydenís Mac Flecknoe, John Lockeís account of personal identity, aesthetic discourse in John Clelandís Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, Edmund Burkeís theory of taste, Gothic fiction, Jane Austenís novels, and Benjamin Constantís Wallstein.His article on live-tooth transplantation, published in Eighteenth-Century Life, won the 2004-05 James L. Clifford Prize, awarded annually by the American Society of Eighteenth-Century Studies for an outstanding study of some aspect of eighteenth-century culture. Other scholarly work has appeared in such journals as Restoration, Eighteenth-Century Fiction, Studies in Romanticism, Philological Quarterly, Modern Philology, and Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture.Dr. Blackwell recently finished editing a collection of essays on the it-narrative, a subgenre of the novel in which animals or objects serve as central characters or even narrators.Entitled The Secret Life of Things: Animals, Objects, and It-Narratives in Eighteenth-Century England, the book will be published by Bucknell University Press in 2007.He is also working on a book on it-narratives and the late eighteenth-century novel, tentatively entitled Personable Properties.

Mark Blackwell

Auerbach 204

768-4941

 

Curriculum Vitae